Hotel Interiors

Modern Hotel Bar Design

Modern Hotel Bar Design

Modern design is design that is clean, minimal, and often times has flare or inspiration from the 1920-1950s. By using it as the design focus for the bar and restaurant design ideas, it lets you keep the bar area simple, and not overdo it. Showcasing the necessities, but in a way that will still stick out to your guests. 

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With a Touch of Mother Nature:

With a modern take on minimalism hotel bars are left bare, figuratively and quiet literally too. Keeping to a natural palette, the only element of color that is seen is through the incorporation of indoor plants. Some bar interiors even get as creative to make it seem as you are sipping on your cosmopolitan in a garden, with great, green vines draped around the bar. Others keep to a simpler look with touches of wood for accent and a planter or two at the bar.

 

All-White:

The ultimate image of a modern bar interior is all white furniture, giving the room so much negative space. The negative space also works to open up the room and give it an air of lightness. While having an all-white aesthetic to your design, it really lets the colors of the food stand out and opens up the experience for the guests that are at the bar.  An all-white bar interior is sure to be a show stopper, and guaranteed to turn a few heads!

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Deep Texture and Warmth:

The other side of the coin to modern design is the use of deep textured wood that adds a sense of warmth to any room. The deep and rich colors work to add in depth, and give the room a more mature look. But to avoid a look that could be considered too mature, hotels are adding in different industrial textures, still keeps it modern, but allows for more creativity and freedom with the design.

 

Hotel bar interiors are like the kitchen of a home, there is constant movement and in many ways is the stomach of the hotel. It is where guests meet up before heading out for the night, or meet with a business guest, or just pass by to get a quick snack. It is important to consider all the different occasions that it’ll be used for, and how the modern design will embrace it all. 

Luxury Lobby Trends

Luxury Lobby Trends

 

When guests go to stay in hotels they are looking to have unique experiences, from the amenities, guest service, and design aspect, they are looking for that something, that jena se qua. Something that when they go back home they can share with their friends and family, and this something should begin the minute they step into your hotel, with the lobby. Luxury hotels know this, and that is why we often find ourselves looking to them for design inspiration. Luxury hotel lobby décor has that “wow factor,” and here is how they have done it. 

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Views For 2017

Luxury hotels can have the benefit of already being in a great location, and this works to their benefit when thinking of design. A nice view in the lobby can be a big selling point for some guests. Walking in and seeing a city skyline or a well-designed garden can begin any trip with the right mindset. Luxury hotel interior design plays up their natural light and location benefits, it’s all about knowing your strengths and playing to those. 

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Greenery

It is no surprise that the Pantone color for 2017 was “Greenery,” and since then the rise of indoor plants has gained popularity. Luxury hotels and other design firms are turning to indoor plants to give the room energy and life. Indoor plants not only help to clean the air and release endorphins, but if they are well kept they add a nice aesthetic to the room. Luxury interior design use indoor plants as a focal point in their lobby rather than subtle details that can be missed. Luxury hotels work to bring the outdoor in and to give it an all-encompassing feel. No matter the size of the plants it can work as a benefit to create and inviting atmosphere. 

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Unique Layout

Luxury hotels have worked in the element of surprise in their design. When you walk into a luxury hotel lobby, you might expect to walk in a see the standard hotel layout design, and the reception desk being the first thing you see, and while sometimes that might be the case, it is beginning to shift more. Now luxury hotel lobby designs are creating layouts that include a reception desk that is further off to the side and a restaurant that is the first thing you see or even bringing in elements of water. Such as, pods or waterfalls to add to a comfortable and inviting environment.

Luxury hotels exist to ensure a hotel experience that is sure to leave you stunned and amazed, as well as inspiration for other hotels.

 

 

Hospitality & Fine Art Trends

Hospitality and Fine Art Trends

 

While every hotel isn’t going to have a Warhol or a Picasso in it. There is one thing I have learned from year for being a hotel interior designer, and it is that they will always have art in them. The reason for this is because art is expressive, art is a reflection of our life, and for many of us owning a good piece of art in our home is aspirational, and vacation is built off of our aspiration for how we want our daily life to be. Hotels know this, hospitality design firms know this, and that is why there will always be art in the hotel and in the rooms. In fact, The Silo hotel in Cape Town even went as far as to have their hotel above the Museum of Contemporary Art Africa. The trends that come from art in hotels always have one thing in common, like all good design it needs to work together with the hospitality and design look.

 

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Time Traveling:

With hotels beginning to put an emphasis on their location and building a connection and relationship between their location and their guests, one of the ways they do so, is through art. In hotels that have a strong locational influence, or time period influence, they make sure all of their design details help to bring it to life. Art work is a great way to bring a time period to life because you are not only able to see the lifestyle of the subjects, but also their moods, and activities. Plus, with art work it is easy to tell the difference between contemporary pieces, expressionism pieces, and modern pieces. Art is one of my favorite ways to date a room and then use the design elements in the room to compliment it and really bring the time period to life. 

 

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Setting the Mood:

In design we always use color to set the mood and feel of a room. The bluer the tones used, the more relaxed guests will feel and the more yellow the more energized they will feel. When we use art to set the mood, we go off of those same key point, but then also look at the construction of the art and strokes that the painter used, are the strokes soft and feel whimsical or are they straighter and more concrete. A good piece of art adds to the room, like a last puzzle piece it fits with the aesthetic of the whole room and compliments it. Art should never distract from the rest of the room, so if the room has deeper tones it is best to keep your artwork in deeper tones, but you can use art work with color to make it pop and tie in with any accent color you are already using. 

 

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Experiential Hotel Design

What is Experiential Design?

Experiential design is design that has a voice. With one glimpse, a guest can walk into your hotel and know what elements of design are your focus, where you draw inspiration from, and what the brand represents. Experiential Design is a hospitality design trend that is meant to add to the hotel experience & create a visual narrative for hotel guests that leaves a memorable impression.

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PDG Website

Experiential Design is the way that hotels work to bring their story to life via design. Hotels that have a strong sense of history, whether it is from being in a restoration building or their surrounding city just has a strong sense of pride, it can be brought in with design elements. Examples of strong historic design would be through exposed brick, bringing in furniture that has elements that reflected upon the historic time period of the original building or culture of the city it resides, and focal design points: fireplaces, atriums, and courtyards. For Millennial generations a strong connection with local cultures and locals is important to them while traveling, and through the use of experiential design, the hotel interior design is able to reflect that. Whether it is bringing in local artists and having their art reflected in the rooms or through the cuisine in the restaurants, especially if it is local sourced, or holding events with the local communities can work to make the connection.

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PDG Website

Health is becoming an increasingly important topic around the world. Guests are looking to keep their healthy lifestyle while still on vacation. By using Experiential Design, you can build the idea of health and wellness into your brand by having a luxury hotel design state of the art gym that is open at all hours, and even fitness and meditation classes, for guests seeking a more guided workout. Keeping greenery in and around the hotel also works to bring in a sense of comfort and overall wellness especially if it works to block out any additional city noise or lights.

 When Experiential Design is used correctly it can work to build loyal guests because it creates a sense of connection and connecting with your hotel. Experiential Design brings to life your message, of hospitality and design, and lets guests live that message as their reality during their stay.

 

 

Hospitality Inspiration: Beautifully Designed Hotel Spaces Across the Nation

To find a beautiful hotel, or hospitality design inspiration, one doesn’t have to plan a trip to Lake Como, in Italy or Rio De Janeiro, in Brazil. The US is a vast country and each coast and city carries its own spirit and can cater to a different design style. We have gathered a list of inspiring design trends in hospitality with photos that will have you wanderlusting and planning your next vacation. 

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EAST Miami Website

Bienvenido a Miami:

When telling someone that you are vacationing in Miami, their mind might go straight to well known hotels such as The Colony Hotel on South Beach. While iconic, this hotel doesn’t represent all of Miami. Miami has evolved a great deal in the past decade. While still a popular vacation destination along the beach, it has begun to extend more into downtown, and the new bombing arts district, Wynwood, and with that, so has the design style. EAST Miami is located in Brickell, which puts it a short driving distance to beaches, shopping, and Wynwood. What EAST Miami does so well, is that it is a modern hotel, and it reinforces that idea with its clean lined décor, white walls, ample space, and floor to celling windows in the rooms that provide you with incredible city and coastal views of all of Miami. While having a modern, luxury, interior design EAST Miami balances it's city feel out with a lot of greenery. The 20,000 square foot pool deck is surrounded with plants and palm trees giving it the illusion that it is tucked away from the city. The element of greenery is tied in with the wooden décor that is carried throughout the rooms, and the bar interior, Domain and Sugar, and restaurant Quinto La Huella. EAST Miami is the perfect combination of clean and modern while still feeling like an illusive relaxing resort.

New York State of Mind: 

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The Beekman website

While on paper The Beekman and 11 Howard couldn’t be any more different, they have one key design feature in common: a pop of color. The Beekman carries itself like something out of a Wes Anderson film. When you walk in you’ll find yourself welcomed by a tapestry covered lobby desk and black and white tiled flooring, and all complemented by a Victorian style atrium. There is no denying the history that has been restored in The Beekman. The rooms while simpler and brighter have a quirky feel with pops of yellow and magenta, which pair so well with the pops of hunter green in the lobby and teal bar stools at the bar. 

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11 Howard website

 

11 Howard, located in Soho, has a subtle look while encompassing strong plays of neutrals and mid-century modern furniture. 11 Howard, represents the modern luxury interior design of Soho and stays trend focused. 11 Howard has pops of a saturated, midnight blue color throughout the hotel décor. The deep navy flows through the hotel as a river would from winding sofas, to draping curtains, and navy lighting by the winding staircase.

Don’t Mess With Texas: 

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Hotel Saint George website

Hotel Saint George, located in Marfa, Texas, feels as though you are staying in an art gallery. With over 200 pieces of art, most of which created by local artist, scattered all throughout the hotel in the lobby, rooms, and in the infamous Book Co. which often holds lectures and readings. There is no shortage of design inspiration at Hotel Saint George, because if it is not coming from any of the artwork, or the Book Co. than it is sure to be from the Laventure, which describes itself as, “rustic American cuisine…with regional flavors and ingredients.” Hotel Saint George is Marfa. From the art to the food, the design is reflective of its location, and the history of being in the same building as the original Hotel Saint George, from 1886.

Our list of trending hotels with great design, each have a very distinct brand and vision, and a unique overall look. Whether it is a play on its history, inspiration from its current surroundings, or just a bold take on design, all the hotels on this list are unique, and while they may inspire many, there won’t be another quite like them around. 

 

Hospitality Design Influence on Guest Experience

When walking into a hotel, the very first thing that will catch your eye is the design. As guests enter the lobby of their hotel, they are absorbing the colors textures and shapes within the space. Is the style modern, industrial, traditional or is it eclectic? Perhaps there are colorful tiles with intricate patterns on the stairs, or a beautiful seating arrangement near a water feature that would make for a great photo opportunity before heading out to dinner. Great design in hospitality is meant to draw the guests into the space and create a visual narrative that they can remember long after check-out. Design is important for the owner, the brand, and the guest. With hotel owners prioritizing their guests and guest experience, they are focused more on creating hotels with great interior design. While a beautiful hotel lobby might receive a positive yelp review, a room that is built with the guest in mind, and top notch service will be awarded with a five-star review. There are two main types of hotel guests: families and business travelers, and it is important to keep their guest experience in mind when thinking of design.

 

PDG Website

PDG Website

Family First:

When a family is traveling together, different members of the family will have different needs. If a family is traveling with a young child, or two, while at check-in, the simple offering to baby proof the room could make all the difference for the parents and children. Offering activities such as movie night for the kids with complimentary popcorn, or babysitting service, so the parents can have a relaxing night out, or even just providing the families with rooms that have more space - after all, four people, and their luggage, crowded into one guest room without the proper floor planning and furniture that offers storage solutions, might feel a bit crammed. By focusing on the family dynamic - hotel suite designs have the opportunity to accommodate the needs of guests and increase the satisfaction of their over all stay.

 

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Stress Free business:

People who travel for business, especially younger generations, such as millennials, are known to extend their business trips an extra day or two in order to enjoy and explore the destination or city they are visiting has to offer. When traveling for business, it is essential in our hotel room design process to make choices and specifications that help reduce any additional stress that could be avoided for the guest to optimize their social strategy. The best way for hotels to reduce stress is through mobile applications, keyless entry into rooms creating the convenience of having everything important in one place. Hotel room design trends have also began improving design by adding storage for suitcases that way it reduces the stress of unpacking and leaving things behind. With design elements like Apple TV and The Echo, guests have the ability to entertain colleagues if they choose to, or just relax after the day catching up on their favorite TV shows. Hotels are starting to ask us to design their bathrooms with more “spa features,” such as:  bathtubs with jets, vanities, waterfall showers, and even pairing up with high end salons to develop upscale toiletries specific to their brand. 

 

Even though these demographics are very different and each hotel guest values different experiences, as hotel designers, we can make strategic decisions in our design process to help improve the guests overall experience, no matter what their preferences are. A little goes a long way. An Apple TV with complementary popcorn, can make for a relaxing night in, when a guest is feeling tired or the weather is bad. These small touches can elevate the experience to a five-star quality stay. 

Are Millennials The New Traveler and Are They Shaping the Hospitality Industry?

Are Millennials The New Traveler and are they Shaping the Hospitality Industry?

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PDG Website

 

The millennial generation, aged 20-36 years old, who as they are getting older, graduating college, beginning their careers, and moving up in the workforce have already begun to have impacts on the economy. However, if trends keep moving the way they are currently, one thing is for sure, travel is of the upmost importance to the millennial generation. Many millennials are even quoted saying they placing saving money to travel over saving money to buy a car, or if they had more money they would spend it on travel. While still a relatively young generation, many are still single and without kids, so their desires and the way they travel is very different from past generations, and that is beginning to have an impact on the hospitality and design industry. 

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Rise in Secondary Locations:

With the abundance of social media in their lives, and the ability to share all of their experiences and information with their friends. Millennials are always looking for new adventures that way, their social media image doesn’t become a cookie cutter replica of everyone else’s posts. The hospitality and travel industry are noticing the spike in travel preferences for secondary cities that have less normative tourist experiences. Hotels have been looking to secondary cities such as Washington DC, Rameswaram, and The Azores to give millennial travelers a unique travel destination that is more grounded in local culture than focused on tourist. Much of the rise of secondary cities also comes from companies like Airbnb, which gave millennials the opportunity to travel anywhere, and rent a room. The appeal that the secondary cities have for millennials comes from their desire to understand the culture, taste local cuisine, and even befriend a local or two, to really get immersed in the cities.

 

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Innovative Amenities:

Millennials want opportunities to explore the cultures best and while many of them have been turning to active lifestyles the hospitality and design industry has taken notice. In an effort to attract more millennial guests’ hotels have been partnering up with local chefs to alternative and cook in the hotel restaurant, some have gone even as far as to hold farmer’s markets in a way to let guests purchase local produce or other souvenirs. Some hotels have found that something as simple as offering vegan and local treats in the mini bar is what millennials are looking for and appreciate. While millennials love adventurous activities they often don’t travel with gear, so hotels have begun to rent hiking and mountain biking gear, while partnering with local tour guides to give millennials views and adventures that are individualistic based on skill and time of day.

 

When traveling millennials are looking to make a more personal connection with their destination. Rather than it just be white sheets and guided tours, the millennial traveler is looking to learn and experience the culture in a way that feels like they got their money’s worth and photos to prove it.